Tag Archives: Post prompts

Illness & Mortality

Making the best choice for a loved one because they’re aging or sick is hard. We have to look for the best places that our loved one can go for senior assisted care living or best place to take them when they’re sick. During this time, it is hard to find the best resources because death or sickness can be sudden sometimes.  If we do not know much about the many options we have, we might make a poor choice. Doing a bit of research before the time comes can be helpful. Being informed on many options is helpful when those times come in our way.

I found this web called Aging & Long Term Care of Eastern Washington. What I found most immediately helpful is that the website have a lot of common questions to click on if someone wants to know the answers. For instance, it has questions that many consumers would like to know. One of the questions it has there is “what kinds of services are available for seniors and people with disabilities?” In addition, there are other questions answered that many people have.

What lead to more questions than answers was about their medical insurance. When I clicked on where it said “medical insurance”, I was a bit confuse what SHIBA was. There was some information about SHIBA; however, I was not quite sure what SHIBA was as I have never heard of it. I had more questions about what exactly it was so I did a bit of research on my own. I found out a lot more information about this program once I searched. Other than having more questions about SHIBA from a first glance, I found this website somewhat useful. My suggestion to people would be to look somewhere else if the website was not useful or if it was useful but they just have more questions about the program. I suggest to do research if there are questions they want answered.

“Aging, disabled, Medicaid, applications, help, information, disabilities.” Aging and Long Term Care of Eastern Washington, http://www.altcew.org/aging-disability-resources-senior-information-assistance/.

 

Advertisements

Food Prompt 2

After reading, “Why ‘Everything in Moderation’ Doesn’t Work”, it wasn’t very surprising to me the way people perceive eating in moderation actually isn’t good for them. I’m pretty guilty that I used to think like this, I made myself think that eating a bowl of fruit or salad could “cancel” out the gummy worms I ate that day. But I recently changed that mindset after realizing it was not helping with my weight and I was still consuming the sugar, fats, and calories that junk food has. Something else I learned was that even if you eat healthy, having a treat regularly creates an imbalance. I admit that I do at times eat what feels like “moderation,” but I am trying to work on that by cancelling out sugary, fatty, high-caloric foods. Since I am trying to be more physically active by doing weight training and cardio more often, I noticed that what I eat can impact my energy level while working out that day. Eating unhealthy foods made me tired more easily than when I ate something nutritious before working out. I appreciated that the article brought up, “We need to stop self-judging our morals based on our food choices…If you eat a healthful food, you are getting more healthful – you are neither a good nor bad person.” I believe the whole point of this article is to teach people that eating in moderation isn’t what they think it is. That by having some ice cream every day after eating healthy foods can affect you, and people need to start understanding that. However, we shouldn’t beat ourselves up if we have a treat once in a while.

Finances Prompt 1

The first article I read was the Crackdown on Cheating Companies. After reading this article it doesn’t surprise me that large companies are misclassifying their employees to save themselves some money. Companies take advantage of full-time employees without actually having to pay or offer benefits that normally would come with being a full-time employee. The next article I read was about student loan debt and how to overcome it. This article was really helpful especially for college students like us who probably all have some sort of loans out that will need to be paid back after graduation. I think it is critical for people to know about the consequences that happen when you ignore your loan payments. Personally I know there have been times in my life where I have ignored responsibilities and it only causes things to get much much worse. That why these tips were helpful! Lastly, I read the article that touched on Debt and Deceased Relatives. This article really surprised me because I honestly thought that when you die, your debt is erased, simply because well, you are dead. Who’s going to pay it? Collecting estate to pay off debt seems reasonable if the person dies, however I think going as far to collecting it from significant others is drastic. I think it’s important to know that debt collectors are only allowed to contact third parties in order to obtain contact information ONCE. Its also important to know that you are legally allowed to have collectors stop contacting you. Just make sure to send that letter and get a return receipt for proof. As a consumer, it gives me hope that there is more investigation being done on companies who are misclassifying their employees. As an employee of a really large company myself, I would have to be taken advantage of by being called a “contractor” when I am still abiding by all company rules and not my own work. I think the first step in solving these problems is creating awareness for the consumers (I did not know about this deception going on, how many others don’t?) The more consumers know about it, the more change can happen. As for policy makers, it sounds like they are headed in the right direction with investigating unlawful companies. Making stricter consequences for companies misclassifying their employees could also aid in solving this issue.

Early Life Matters Prompt 1

Looking through the Birth slides and some of the readings on the Early Life Matters content pages has opened my eyes to the vulnerability of parents to unneeded items and medical “necessities”. Firstly, medication; according to the National Women’s Health Network, “ART [assisted reproductive technology] is expensive (averaging $12,400 per cycle, with many patients requiring two or more cycles) and often is not covered by insurance, so it is natural for patients to seek a provider that can maximize their chance of success. Yet, a recent analysis of web content from 372 U.S. fertility clinics (out of a total of 381 clinics) suggests that the success rates being promoted are not based on reputable practices and/or standards,” (Walden, 2015). This shows that ART is neither an affordable nor a reputable practice that cannot be relied on, and yet thousands of families do. Secondly, according to the Birth Slides, a Cesarean Section is the most common surgical procedure in the United States with rates at about 31.8%. However, the rates are different based on hospital policies, not on health. Furthermore, the cost of vaginal birth and a Cesarean section are not the same, and while there is a plan to equalize the payment, one is not in place as of yet.

Keeping with the theme of unneeded vs. needed medical expenses, next to discuss is an article entitled “The Cord Blood Controversy”. In this article, many parents have chosen to freeze their child’s umbilical cord after birth in case of an autoimmune disease or genetic defect that could be cured with the stem cells from the cord. However, the problem with this is that not only does it cost a large sum of money, currently $1,000 to $2,000, it also may not be effective. If the infant has a genetic defect or a disease, the same defect or disease is likely in the umbilical cord, therefore rendering the stem cells in it useless to the child. In fact, to quote the article, “Both the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued statements in the late 1990s opposing the use of for-profit banks — and criticizing their marketing tactics,” (Moninger). However, it was stated that the umbilical cords may be donated to a public institution to be available for free for children who need stem cells. Lastly, we will revisit the Cesarean section topic. In the United States, if a mother has had a Cesarean section before, she will be denied a vaginal birth in the future. This is problematic because, as mentioned before, Cesarean sections are more expensive than natural births. However, according to the article “More women should have choice of vaginal birth after C-section, panel says” this information is untrue. In this article, and independent panel of women’s health experts say that “U.S. women should be given the option to have a vaginal birth after cesarean, stating that such births are reasonably safe,” (Roan, 2010). In other words, families have been forced to spend thousands of dollars on a procedure that they may not need which would impact them financially in a significant way. Families appear to be duped out of money from contraception to birth, and probably long after. Pre-parents and young parents need to look into all of their options for conceiving and birthing before making a decision. If they decide to visit a doctor, they should attempt to bring a list of questions so that they are able to get all of their answers at once and therefore spend less money. Everyone knows that being a parent is hard work and a lot of money, but many people do not realize that being a pre-parent can also be extremely expensive.

Bibliography

Moninger, J. (2017). The Cord Blood Controversy. Retrieved from http://www.parents.com/pregnancy/my-baby/cord-blood-banking/the-cord-blood-controversy/

Roan, S. (2010, March). More women should have choice of vaginal birth after C-section, panel says. Retrieved from http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-0323-hosp-vbac-20100323-story.html

Walden, R. (2015, October). Direct-to-Consumer: Fertility Clinic Advertising on the Web. Retrieved from https://www.nwhn.org/direct-to-consumer-fertility-clinic-advertising-on-the-web/.

Thinking and Discourse Prompt

It is interesting and quite funny how having different wording for things, but still have the same meaning can affect the way people answer these questions. The differences between the two poll questions is that the first one is straight to the point (talking about Medicare), and the second one does not exactly say it is Medicare, only describes it. To me, poll question 1 is more clear because it is straight to the point as long as you understand what Medicare is and does. The second poll question may take more thought into answering because although it describes what Medicare is, the person might be taking other factors into thought about insurance such as having to pay more taxes.