Category Archives: Health Care

Kiwis and Eagles and Prescription Medication

The United States and New Zealand are unique in a very particular way: you’ll be able to see advertisements on television for different prescription drugs – you know, to mention to your doctor in case you suffer from any of the symptoms that the advertisement seems to mention.

They’re iconic for their awkwardness – whether it be the timing (watching an erectile dysfunction ad with family can be a tad offputting), or the endless barrage of symptoms (the joke that the drug will kill you before the actual disease does), the rule is unique to the US and New Zealand, two countries that share a language and an affinity for a bird (the bald eagle, and the kiwi, respectively), but are on completely different sides of the world.

While those will argue that it can offer some increased awareness of certain conditions, or treatments for conditions, and can give autonomy for patients, I think that this particular issue shouldn’t be something just given out.

Aside from the practical standpoint of it raising medical costs through a bloated advertising budget – I’m a public relations major, and I have come to fully understand that a television commercial campaign can become expensive. Other mediums tend to be less expensive for advertising, but in general, ads are expensive.

It also encourages people to ask for name brand, which, if a generic is available, should really be what is prescribed unless the taker has an allergy to binding ingredients in the generic, or something along those lines. If people specifically are able to get that same coverage for a name brand as a generic, when there is an alternative, it can bring up healthcare costs for all others and effectively raise premiums. Which, would be fine, if it was necessary: but when people are told that “Xyterna” (this is a fake name for a drug that I made up, if this is really the name of a prescription drug then I guess that’s the career path I should look into) is the way to go, many who may not be educated may demand to doctors thats what they want.

Not to mention: doctors should be making healthcare recommendations for patients, not the other way around. If that was the case, then I’m sure there’d be hundreds of people who were real proud of their ‘ice cream diet’ and how much it’s helping them lose weight.

I feel as though the protections that are in place in certain places are definitely a benefit: while I understand not everyone has the same worldview as me (that intervention through agencies and the ‘red tape’ of process and time, is, typically, the only way to make sure that things are not done for the gain of corporate interests), I do think, generally, it’s in peoples best interest to make sure that the things that they’re consuming are safe for them, and in the case of advertising on behalf of a pharmaceutical, it can be potentially dangerous. It’s a gross thing to me, advertisement for healthcare, though again: that’s one that’s up in the air, depending on your worldview.

Advertisements

Challenge: are you using personal products with harmful ingredients instead of products that have organic or plant based ingredients? Reasons; read below.

  1. Pick five products such as shampoos, soaps, hair coloring, toothpaste,  and make-up.
  2. Read the ingredients and see if they are all organic and safe ingredients.
  3. Please post as to if you’re planning to replace or already using safe products for your skin.

 

Many products list “fragrance” on the label, but very few name the specific ingredients that make up a “fragrance.” This lack of disclosure prevents consumers from knowing the full list of ingredients in their products. While most fragrance chemicals are not disclosed, we do know that some are linked to serious health problems such as cancer, reproductive and developmental toxicity, allergies and sensitivities. Clearly, there is a need for stronger regulations, more research, and greater transparency.

FOUND IN: Most personal care products including sunscreen, shampoo, soap, body wash, deodorant, body lotion, makeup, facial cream, skin toner, serums, exfoliating scrubs and perfume.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR ON THE LABEL: Fragrance, perfume, parfum, essential oil blend, aroma.

WHAT IS FRAGRANCE? Fragrance is defined by the FDA as a combination of chemicals that gives each perfume or cologne (including those used in other products) its distinct scent. Fragrance ingredients may be derived from petroleum or natural raw materials. Companies that manufacture perfume or cologne purchase fragrance mixtures from fragrance houses (companies that specialize in developing fragrances) to develop their own proprietary blends. In addition to “scent” chemicals that create the fragrance, perfumes and colognes also contain solvents, stabilizers, UV-absorbers, preservatives, and dyes. MORE…

HEALTH CONCERNS: The International Fragrance Association (IFRA) lists 3,059 materials that are reported as being used in fragrance compounds.[1] Of these 3,059 ingredients, some have evidence linking them to health effects including cancer, reproductive toxicity, allergies and sensitivities.

A 2016 study assessed self-reported health effects from fragrance. This survey of a random sample of US residents found that 99.1% of participants are exposed to fragranced products at least once a week from their own use, others’ use, or both. Participants also reported an extensive list of health effects experienced when exposed to fragrance ranging from migraines and asthma to gastrointestinal problems and cardiovascular problems. The findings showed that a high percentage of the participants did not know of the chemicals included in fragrance and would not continue to use a fragranced product if they had previously known it emitted pollutants.[2]

Acetaldehyde: Acetaldehyde adversely affects kidneys and the reproductive, nervous and respiratory systems.[3] This chemical is listed as known or suspected to cause cancer in California’s Proposition 65.[4] Both the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the National Toxicology Program classify acetaldehyde as potentially carcinogenic to humans.[5], [6]

Benzophenone: Benzophenone is linked to endocrine disruption and organ system toxicity,[7] and experimental studies suggest benzophenone may lead to several kinds of tumors.[8] Derivatives of benzophenone, such as benzophenone-1 (BP-1) and oxybenzone (BP-3), are potential endocrine disruptors.[9]Benzophenone is listed as a possible human carcinogen under California’s Proposition 65.[10]MORE…

VULNERABLE POPULATIONS: All, especially pregnant women, infants

Many products list “fragrance” on the label, but very few name the specific ingredients that make up a “fragrance.” This lack of disclosure prevents consumers from knowing the full list of ingredients in their products. While most fragrance chemicals are not disclosed, we do know that some are linked to serious health problems such as cancer, reproductive and developmental toxicity, allergies and sensitivities. Clearly, there is a need for stronger regulations, more research, and greater transparency.

FOUND IN: Most personal care products including sunscreen, shampoo, soap, body wash, deodorant, body lotion, makeup, facial cream, skin toner, serums, exfoliating scrubs and perfume.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR ON THE LABEL: Fragrance, perfume, parfum, essential oil blend, aroma.

WHAT IS FRAGRANCE? Fragrance is defined by the FDA as a combination of chemicals that gives each perfume or cologne (including those used in other products) its distinct scent. Fragrance ingredients may be derived from petroleum or natural raw materials. Companies that manufacture perfume or cologne purchase fragrance mixtures from fragrance houses (companies that specialize in developing fragrances) to develop their own proprietary blends. In addition to “scent” chemicals that create the fragrance, perfumes and colognes also contain solvents, stabilizers, UV-absorbers, preservatives, and dyes. MORE…

HEALTH CONCERNS: The International Fragrance Association (IFRA) lists 3,059 materials that are reported as being used in fragrance compounds.[1] Of these 3,059 ingredients, some have evidence linking them to health effects including cancer, reproductive toxicity, allergies and sensitivities.

A 2016 study assessed self-reported health effects from fragrance. This survey of a random sample of US residents found that 99.1% of participants are exposed to fragranced products at least once a week from their own use, others’ use, or both. Participants also reported an extensive list of health effects experienced when exposed to fragrance ranging from migraines and asthma to gastrointestinal problems and cardiovascular problems. The findings showed that a high percentage of the participants did not know of the chemicals included in fragrance and would not continue to use a fragranced product if they had previously known it emitted pollutants.[2]

Acetaldehyde: Acetaldehyde adversely affects kidneys and the reproductive, nervous and respiratory systems.[3] This chemical is listed as known or suspected to cause cancer in California’s Proposition 65.[4] Both the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the National Toxicology Program classify acetaldehyde as potentially carcinogenic to humans.[5], [6]

Benzophenone: Benzophenone is linked to endocrine disruption and organ system toxicity,[7] and experimental studies suggest benzophenone may lead to several kinds of tumors.[8] Derivatives of benzophenone, such as benzophenone-1 (BP-1) and oxybenzone (BP-3), are potential endocrine disruptors.[9]Benzophenone is listed as a possible human carcinogen under California’s Proposition 65.[10]MORE…

VULNERABLE POPULATIONS: All, especially pregnant women, infants

SOURCE:   http://www.safecosmetics.org/get-the-facts/chemicals-of-concern/fragrance/

 

Next ingredient to avoid in skincare products since it is so many of them is Paraben.  Below is another article about the dangers of Paraben in products.

Parabens are synthetic preservatives used in foods, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and personal care products such as deodorants, moisturizers and shampoos. Common parabens include methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben and butylparaben. Parabens allow skin care products to survive for months or even years in your medicine cabinet; however, they also enter your body through your skin when you use these products. According to Mercola.com, the body can absorb as much as five pounds of cosmetic chemicals every year. Parabens can mimic hormones in the body and disrupt functions of the endocrine system.

Breast Cancer

Colby College’s Clean Makeup website reports that parabens can mimic estrogen and disrupt the body’s hormone system. Cornell University reports that a high lifelong exposure to estrogen can increase breast cancer risk. Estrogen, and synthetic chemicals that act like estrogen, play a role in stimulating the division of breast cells and affect other hormones that stimulate breast cell division. Your body does not easily break down synthetic estrogen, and it can accumulate in fat cells, including breast tissue. In 2004, a study by the University of Reading in the United Kingdom found concentrations of parabens, particularly methylparaben, in human breast tumors. The study examined only the presence of parabens in the tumors but did not determine that they were the cause of the tumors.

Decreased Sperm Levels

Parabens can also adversely affect the male reproductive system. In a study by the Tokyo Metropolitan Research Laboratory of Public Health, researchers administered parabens to three-week-old rats. After four weeks, researchers examined the rats and found their sperm production significantly decreased in relation to the amount of parabens they had received. The rats who received the highest dose of parabens, which was consistent with the daily acceptable intake of parabens in Europe and Japan, showed a significant decrease in sperm concentration.

 

This is why I do not purchase any products with these ingredients and other harmful ingredients.   I have only listed two harmful ingredients but there are others that can mess with our health.    Yes, it costs more but your skin absorbs everything so don’t  you want what goes on the body is the best for your skin; afterall, I have read skin is our biggest organ.   I use coupons which help me save some monies plus it feels good when I use better for you products.

Let me know if some of you are replacing and what you think of this information.

Thanks,

Indera

 

 

 

CP & R, prompt 1

Has everyone heard of the popular ‘MSG’; well, I’m not a fan of it.   I don’t care if it is a food enhancer.   It is not really good for you and it makes some people eat more.  Following are two of many examples listed about ‘msg’ and there is much more information when you look up this money making ingredient.   This food additive does not seem to be good for you from everything I read.  I tried to avoid this ingredient if at all possible by limiting junk food intake and other processed foods; this is the only way to control msg(monosodium glutamate) intake as it in so many foods.

Is MSG Bad for You? | Yale Scientific Magazine

Monosodium glutamate. It’s in your Chinese take-out. It’s in your finger-licking delicious Nacho Cheese Doritos. And it’s definitely in your late-night bowl of Ramen noodles. Used for decades as a food additive and flavor-enhancer, monosodium glutamate (MSG) has been called many things, from a merely unhealthy additive to an addictive neurotoxin.

Monosodium glutamate, widely known to us as MSG, has a bad rap. The food additive, which has been used for decades in Chinese food, canned vegetables, and processed meat, has been associated with several medical symptoms including headache, sweating, and numbness in some people, according to the US Food and Drug Administration.

Source:   https://www.cnet.com/news/is-msg-really-all-that-bad-for-you

Some articles say that only when you eat on an empty stomach; it is bad for you but other articles say that it doesn’t matter because it is an extra ingredient that makes your junk food taste good so many of us keep buying them.

There are no regulations for labeling processed free glutamic acid (MSG).

For instance:

IN A NUTSHELL

There are no regulations that require the identification (labeling) of all processed free glutamic acid (MSG) present in processed food. Consumers have no way of knowing if there is processed free glutamic acid (MSG) in processed food, and if there is any, how much or how little there is.

The FDA has proposed no regulations for identifying all processed free glutamic acid (MSG) in processed food.

Never has the FDA suggested that all MSG in processed food might be labeled.

Similarly, consumers have no way of knowing how much processed free glutamic acid (MSG) remains in and/or on MSG-sprayed crops (produce) when brought to market.

Source:   http://www.truthinlabeling.org/presentregulations.html

To me as a consumer of some junk food purchased even if it is from a natural store, this ingredient(msg) is in there under different names and FDA does not require proper labeling anyway.   So consumers are not protected by FDA just business firms are protected.

I want to know why FDA allows this ingredient in foods and why can’t USDA or some other agency but a stop to this or consumers possibly.   I guess we have to decide for ourselves whether you rather cook most of your foods because many frozen foods have this ingredient also not just junk foods.  It is like the saying “Be your own advocate.”

One more information we are supposed to understand is “While the naturally occurring glutamates in food aren’t dangerous, processed free glutamic acids like MSG are.”  This  statement is repeated in many articles I read already.

Please look up the following agency as they have lots of information about this ‘msg.’  I also have listed above about the link to truthinlabeling.

United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service has tons of information about this topic.

 

Healthcare Prompts:

Prompt 1

I believe the best aspect of the current ACA is the amount of access and coverage that has been added and improved for all Americans, but women and children specifically. With the current ACA, women now have access to all kinds of health and maternity health services that can severely impact the quality of their lives and their families lives in very positive ways. Services offered to women currently no matter their SES, include Family planning, Preventative services (Birth control, Cancer Screenings), Maternity Services, Prescription drug coverage gaps and more. Children can now stay on their parent’s medical coverage until age 26. Through Medicaid, young, uninsured individuals and families can access services that are targeted to improve health and well-being. I believe the best opportunity for improving the way the law works for most ordinary consumers is to make Americans more aware of their options. It is possible that most uninsured individuals are unaware of options and services available to them. If Americans knew what they qualified for they may save themselves a lot of stress and worry. I believe the next step is to improve the number of qualified applicants utilizing these services while they last. They goal is to make sure all Americans have the right to lead happy. healthy lives.

I believe the best thing for a friend to know is that they should always apply for Medicaid or an insurance coverage plan even if THINK they don’t qualify. According to Healthcare.gov, Some states have expanded their Medicaid programs to cover everyone with incomes below a certain level. Other states have yet to do this. So, if you qualify for Medicaid all depends on if your state has expended their program. You can qualify for Medicaid based on factors such as, your income, household size, disability, family status, and other factors. Every state has different eligibility standards. If the state you live in has not expanded their Medicaid, and you believe your income qualifies for Medicaid, make sure to still apply for medical coverage because you may qualify for another coverage plan. If your state did not expand Medicaid and you do not qualify for any standards, you can receive care at a nearby community health center. The health care law has expanded funding to community health centers, which provide primary care for millions of Americans. Long story short, it is a great idea to always apply for medical coverage no matter your status. It is possible you qualify for more than you think! (Medicaid & Chip, Healthcare.gov). If we were to lose Medicaid expansion thousands of individuals and families would lose their coverage and any chance at decent health care (50- State Look at Medicaid Expansion, 2017).

Prompt 2

Before now I had no idea what the CBO was. I know now that it stands for the Congressional Budget Office. I also know now that this senate bill will cause many deserving individuals and families to become uninsured and the ability to obtain health coverage will become much more difficult. The view of healthcare will be less of a right. As an aspiring Public Health professional, the future I see is one where everyone can find access to the services and healthcare they need to ensure healthy bodies and well-beings. I see health being a right opposed to a luxury. With a bill like this, more people will feel the bad than the few that will feel the good. We can hope that those who are still uninsured take advantage of all that we currently have before we see things change drastically.

A 50-State Look at Medicaid Expansion. (2017, July). Retrieved October 09, 2017, from http://familiesusa.org/product/50-state-look-medicaid-expansion

How to Qualify For Medicaid and CHIP Health Care Coverage. (n.d.). Retrieved October 09, 2017, from https://www.healthcare.gov/medicaid-chip/getting-medicaid-chip

https://www.healthcare.gov/medicaid-chip/getting-medicaid-chip/

http://www.nationalpartnership.org/research-library/health-care/summary-of-key-provisions.pdf

Unbiased Sources: Their Importance, and Simplification

As a Public Relations student, I am taught to understand that bias isn’t a bad thing. It’s not. I’ll admit it, a web source I enjoy reading is written from a left-leaning feminist perspective, and ultimately, has a goal other than straight news. However, I also read objective, AP-approved news to augment my understanding of today’s world.

Many of the things that we read in our day-to-day has some type of bias to it – advertisements, blogs, certain newspapers and certain news sources. And that’s fine, I don’t have to agree with the perspective that certain news sources project. The problem is when people don’t recognize the bias that their sources have.

CBO reports are unbiased, comprehensive reports – good things in this day and age of people not being able to effectively read for these biases – it offers a truthful overview of the information that may bore people if not slanted in the direction that they want to hear it from. It offered a good look at the outcome of implementation of one of these last-ditch healthcare policies would offer.

However, due to the fact that one of the few things that I pride myself on is actually being informed about the impacts of particular things, the CBO report didn’t strike me as anything new, really. It offered a more well-rounded explanation of the things that I already knew (and augmented the claims that had been made by the various outlets I follow).

Example – certain, working class voters may not have voted in the leadership they had if they knew that this act would make premiums a higher percentage of their income; and make healthcare generally more inexpensive for those “Coastal Elites” they love to complain about.

What really is interesting, though, is that while it talks about social repercussions of things, it doesn’t explicitly use terminology that people are using – many news outlets (and politicians!) utilize words that are more likely to garner reactions, and less of the technical terms that the CBO uses – things about tax credits bore people, if you’re trying to stir up a reaction about healthcare legislation, you use words that let people run wild with it.

It’s all about phrasing. To find out more, simply look into that rhetoric and analyze.

 

Health Care: Prompt Two

To be completely frank, I have never heard of a CBO report. After reading the summary and perusing through the actual report I learned a great deal about our current state of health care insurance and possibly the future of our health care. The CBO report bluntly states that while the new law will decrease federal spending by $321 billion dollars it will also increase the number of uninsured by 22 million. It is important to know that by enacting the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017 we would be taking away insurance from many individuals. It would nearly eliminate government spending on healthcare and place control of healthcare insurance in the hands of private sectors or markets. Although it will decrease federal spending it will increase individual private out-of-pocket spending for the consumers. Overall, this new legislation would benefit the more fortunate than the less fortunate. This is the basic gist of the report and I would certainly like to know more about specific terms.

For someone reading it like myself who isn’t completely versed in this language or terminology I would like to understand what it all really and truly means. For example, what does it mean to be or not be enrolled in nongroup coverage? Or what does the appropriation of funds for cost-sharing subsidies mean? And what will define the difference between low and high health expenditures? It also mentions waivers to change the structure of subsidies for nongroup coverage or the specifications for essential health benefits (EHBs), what does this look like and what are considered essential health benefits? I would also like to know what the CBO report looks like under the current law. I currently benefit from our current healthcare law and plan on acquiring more knowledge about how I’ll be affected. I definitely could look at the related publications provided at the end of the summary as well as doing some scholarly searching.

Health Care: Prompt Two

I have to start by admitting that I had never read a CBO report or even a summary of one, I actually had no knowledge about what the CBO was. I believe as consumers we all should know about CBO (Congressional Budget Office). And the important information that provides for us the consumers. CBO presents information and analyses surrounding bills and laws in a nonpartisan style which I believe is very important because this means that the information presented is likely to be more accurate and non-biased.

By reading the resource I learned about the estimated direct spending and revenue effect of the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017, which is a Senate amendment in the nature of a substitute to H.R. 1628.  According to the CBO and the Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT) enacting BCRA would reduce the cumulative federal deficit over the 2017-2016 period by $321 billion, 202 billion more than the estimated net saving for the current version of H.R. By 2026 according to the CBO and JCT by 2026, an estimated 49 million people would be uninsured, compared with 28 million who would lack insurance that year under current law.

The effects on the Federal Budget include the estimation that enacting the new legislation would reduce spending by $1,022 billion and reduce revenues by $701 billion for the total net reduction of $321 billion in the deficit over a nine year period. Some of the larges saving would come from reductions in outlays for Medicaid, there would also be a reduction in revenues from repealing penalties on employers who do not offer insurance on people who do not purchase insurance.

Some of the effects on health insurance coverage, include 15 million more people which would be uninsured under this legislation than under current law primarily because the penalty for not having insurance would be eliminated.

I believe it is very important to know that there are uncertainty surrounding the estimates by the CBO and JCT on the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017 as well as the projections under the current law. Despite the uncertainty, the direction of certain effects of this legislation is clear. For example, the amount of federal revenues collected and the amount of spending on Medicaid would surely both be lower than under current law. And the number of uninsured people under this legislation is very likely to be greater than under current law.

I would like to know more about the long term effects of the Better care Reconciliation act of 2017 and I could get more information about it by visiting the following website:

https://www.cbo.gov/publication/52859

Health Care Prompt 2

Being a public health major, it is important to stay up  to date on all health care policies being thrown around on Capitol Hill. However, that does not always mean we are up to date. But the AHCA would have drastically affected how I get healthcare and how many of my friends and family get it as well. The CBO estimated that between 2017 and 2026, there would be a 772 billion dollar decrease in money put into medicaid. This would have lowered federal matching caps for medicaid as well as lowered the amount of people able to enroll in the program. We should also mention that the government spent nearly 700 billion dollars bailing out Wall Street. It seems odd to me that the government would okay spending that much on big banks but not on providing health care to people in the country. Back to the prompt, I believe it is important for those that rely on these services and those that do not to understand how this affects their fellow countrymen. It would be easy to find more information on the CBO website as well as in the ACHA itself. Thankfully, the final attempt to pass some sort of conservative health bill has failed. Sadly, this week employers are no longer required to cover birth control on the insurance plans. But the same people that passed this do not agree with a woman’s right to choose abortion. So they removed access to birth control and want to restrict abortion. This behavior is counterproductive and ignorant.

Health Care: Prompt One

One of the most important aspects of the ACA is the 10 essential health care benefits. This added specific criteria of what insurance must cover in their policies.What are the 10-essential benefits insurance must cover? Healthcare.gov (2017) lists them as:

  1. Ambulatory patient services (outpatient care you get without being admitted to a hospital
  2. Emergency services
  3. Hospitalization
  4. Pregnancy, maternity, and newborn care
  5. Mental health and substance use disorder services
  6. Prescription drugs
  7. Rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices (services and devices to help people with injuries, disabilities, or chronic conditions gain or recover mental and physical skills)
  8. Laboratory services
  9. Preventive and wellness services and chronic disease management
  10. Pediatric services, including oral and vision care (but adult dental and vision coverage aren’t essential health benefits)

I feel like a lot of people don’t really understand how health insurance works (or why companies would not want to cover these 10 things); I had no idea before I took an introduction to public health policy. To sum up private health insurance (very basically): all eligible individuals are placed into a risk pool and each one pays a monthly premium to spread the risk/cost around. These monthly payments pay will cover the costs for health services for sick or injured individuals in the pool.

For example: If you have a risk pool of 100 people and each person pays $100 per month, insurance has $10,000-dollar revenue. But let’s say 10 people in the pool get sick and their care ends up being $15,000 that month, the insurance then is at a loss of $5,000. Insurance is a business and therefore the goal is to make a profit. The company makes more money when their risk pools are comprised of healthy individuals.  This is why insurers used to deny coverage or charge more to individuals with pre-existing conditions.

A preexisting condition is “a health problem you had before the date that new coverage starts” (HHS, 2017). Things like cancer, HIV, pregnancy, Alzheimer’s, acne, mental illness, domestic violence and rape victims, etc. fall into this category. When I found out that people could be denied coverage (and the things which counted as a pre-existing condition) I was stunned. It seemed so wrong and unethical. How could we as a nation leave so many people exposed to huge finical and health risks? People who were already incredibly vulnerable.

The 10 essential health care benefits also require maternity care coverage. Prior to the ACA very few women had maternity coverage. An uncomplicated birth could cost already insured women $10,000 and uninsured women $30,000 (THA 2013). Some Republican politicians do not think men should have to pay for prenatal care, as ‘a man has never delivered a baby’ (Woodall, 2017). I learned in my policy class that every dollar spent in family planning has a 400% return. How is it not in our best interest (morally and economically) to provide this coverage?

Women’s health care protections are especially in danger; just this Friday some protections on birth control coverage were removed from health insurance policies. This allows a company or non-profit to remove contraceptives from their coverage due to religious or moral objections (Kodjak, 2017).

There is an ongoing debate about healthcare in the US. The current administration wants to ‘replace and repeal’ the ACA. The 10 essential health care benefits are in danger, all the proposed replacements have severely weakened or removed them. The US is one of the only developed countries who does not have universal health coverage. These policies largely stem from the belief that healthcare is a privilege, not a right.

 

Works Cited

Kodjak, A., (2017). Trump Guts Requirement that Employer Health Plans Pay for Birth Control. Retrieved from http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/10/06/555970210/trump-ends-requirement-that-employer-health-plans-pay-for-birth-control

Healthcare.gov. (2017). What Marketplace health insurance plans cover. Retrieved from https://www.healthcare.gov/coverage/what-marketplace-plans-cover/

Health and Human Services. (2017). Pre-existing conditions. Retrieved from https://www.hhs.gov/healthcare/about-the-aca/pre-existing-conditions/index.html

Woodall, C., (2017) GOP Congressman asks why men should pay for prenatal care. Retrieved from http://www.pennlive.com/news/2017/03/gop_congressman_asks_why_men_s.html

Truven Health Analytics. (2013). The Cost of Having a Baby in the United States. Retrieved from http://transform.childbirthconnection.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Cost-of-Having-a-Baby1.pdf

Health Care: Prompt One

In my opinion, the Affordable Car Act is extremely important for a large majority of people. There were three goals that the law put its primary focus into. Those goals were:

  1. Make affordable health insurance available to more people. The law provides consumers with subsidies (“premium tax credits”) that lower costs for households with incomes between 100% and 400% of the federal poverty level. (ACA, 2017)
  2. Expand the Medicaid program to cover all adults with income below 138% of the federal poverty level. (Not all states have expanded their Medicaid programs.) (ACA, 2017)
  3. Support innovative medical care delivery methods designed to lower the costs of health care generally. (ACA, 2017)

Health care in the United States has been less than perfect for many years. The ACA was very controversial because many people do not accept change well and the policy is extremely complicated. It can be very difficult to understand all the different aspects of the law. I think the very most important thing for people to understand when discussing the Affordable Care Act is that the main goal was to “move closer to the one objective almost everyone agrees upon: making health care more affordable and more accessible to all people” (Wanamaker, 2017).

Because of the ACA, millions of Americans are given the ability to receive health care. This policy, “eliminates the ability for insurance companies to reject a patient due to pre-existing conditions, allowing children to remain on their parents’ health insurance until age 26 and expanding the eligibility of Medicaid for millions of Americans” (Goldberg, 2012). There is a lot more that the health care act entails. It is extremely detailed and very complicated for most to understand. One of the most difficult things to understand is how or who is paying for the ACA. There are many resources online that explain in detail what the law is about and all it entails. USA Today and CNN have plenty of articles regarding the subject and are very useful tools to use wen educating yourself on our nation’s current health care bill.

The very best aspect of this law is that it was helped a huge majority of Americans. Before we implemented the Affordable Car Act, “about 16 percent of Americans had no health insurance of any kind. Now, that’s down to less than 9 percent — a record low” (Haynes, 2016). Millions of Americans have been helped drastically in the recent years that this law became effective. There were rapid and tremendous improvements since Obamacare. Of course, the law is not perfect and there is much that could be changed. If I had one recommendation, I would suggest that the qualifications of subsidies be decreased. If a family does not qualify, then purchasing insurance through exchanges can be extremely expensive (Cassidy, 2017). “Until policy-holders have covered their deductibles, they have to pay for the full cost of most of the medical services” which are often highly expensive (Cassidy, 2017). The fact of the matter is that this law was created because prices are an issue. The best way to help people afford health care would be to spend more money so that it would bring down the costs that many people face. Nothing will be a quick fix, but my belief is that the ACA was a step in the right direction for the United States.

 

 

Works Cited

Affordable Care Act (ACA) – HealthCare.gov Glossary. (n.d.). Retrieved October 07, 2017, from https://www.healthcare.gov/glossary/affordable-care-act/

 

Cassidy, J. (2017, June 19). Three Ways to Fix Obamacare. Retrieved October 07, 2017, from https://www.newyorker.com/news/john-cassidy/three-ways-to-fix-obamacare

 

Goldberg, L. (2012, March 19). Discuss: Share in Our Policy Ideas. Retrieved October 07, 2017, from https://www.nasi.org/discuss/2012/03/affordable-care-act-turns-two?gclid=Cj0KCQjw9uHOBRDtARIsALtCa95bg0snF_S0QNQQL91fanr_o3ujnA-msmHbfGawvKW3_VMT26sUeTUaAscOEALw_wcB

 

Haynes, C. T. (2016, November 04). Even With Its Faults, Obamacare Has Helped Millions. Retrieved October 07, 2017, from http://www.nationalmemo.com/obamacare-helped-millions/

 

Wanamaker, B. (2017, February). Seize the ACA: The innovator’s guide to the Affordable Care Act. Retrieved October 07, 2017, from https://www.christenseninstitute.org/publications/aca/?gclid=Cj0KCQjw9uHOBRDtARIsALtCa96Lkw4RnTSg0BIZwlDs7pWUEkC2sSMrpN-4nhuFjvcgIiL-0rNm0dcaAiuCEALw_wcB