Glossary Building #5

• After viewing the Department of Health’s website with regards to Death with Dignity I gathered a much better understanding of the Death with Dignity Act. Not only did I gather a more comprehensive definition of the Death with Dignity Act, but I pieced apart the terms “death” and “dignity”.

First, the Death with Dignity Act allows “terminally ill adults seeking to end their life to request lethal doses of medication from medical and osteopathic physicians. These terminally ill patients must be Washington residents who have less than six months to live”. This act was put in place to allow ill willed persons to end their misery and hurt from illness. The act particularly protects these individuals and allows them to die with “dignity”.

Secondly, the word “death” means the action or fact of dying or being killed; the end of the life of a person or organism. The word “dignity” means the state or quality of being worthy of honor or respect; self-respect. Together this means Death with Dignity refers to dying or ending life with the quality off respect for one self.

See: https://www.doh.wa.gov/YouandYourFamily/IllnessandDisease/DeathwithDignityAct/FrequentlyAskedQuestions

• After seeing the title, “Seattle Time’s piece on “selling” senior residents” I was intrigued. I wondered what it meant to “sell” senior residents and read further on what it meant. According to the article seniors who board in your home or a nursing home come with quite a grand ticket price. The article shows how highly profitable the market of senior residents can be. So, when the Seattle Time’s speaks on “selling” senior residents they mean the market for senior resident care is profitable and common in Washington.

See: http://old.seattletimes.com/html/seniorsforsale/2010939195_seniors31.html

• After browsing fda.gov I looked at unapproved drugs and then looked at what determines a drug is approved. According to fda.gov unapproved drugs are drugs marketed in the United States that do not have required FDA approval. So I then looked at how to determine whether a drug is approved or not. Fda.gov clearly explains the steps to take in order to search and clarify whether a drug is approved or not. You can determine whether a drug is approved or not by looking at Orange Book where you can search the trade name or active ingredients. You can also determine whether a drug is approved or not by looking at the National Drug Code Directory and Drugs@FDA. These search engines allow you to determine the approval or disapproval of a drug.

See: https://www.fda.gov/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/EnforcementActivitiesbyFDA/SelectedEnforcementActionsonUnapprovedDrugs/ucm119742.htm

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