Glossary Building Post #2

Glossary Terms:

  • Direct To Consumer advertisement (DTC)
  • Cesarean Birth (C-section)
  • Cord Blood

Parents, and soon to be parents, are vulnerable consumers. They are often bombarded with new fads in childbirth, some new product, etc. Many times these products or services being offered to them are unnecessary, fake, or not truly safe for their children. Terms such as fertility treatments, cesarean birth (C-section), and cord blood are thrown around often these days, but do these consumer truly understand what these terms mean?

Consumers who wish to be parents but are experiencing difficulties conceiving may often seek fertility treatments. Many fertility clinics post DTC advertisements on the web targeting those with difficulties in conceiving. “DTC ads are responsible for 12 percent ($2.6 billion) of the total growth in drug spending in 2000” (Walden 2017). These advertisements tend to overstate treatment benefits, misleading and manipulating consumers to believe that their specific treatment will guarantee results. “47 percent described their success rates as “superior” or “among the best”, without indicating what they were comparing themselves to” (Walden 2017). What vulnerable consumers do not hear about with these advertisements is the actual success of the advertised product. Many times the product has a very small success rate, but vulnerable consumers do not know those details they only see that the treatment is supposed to work. Many consumers end up spend exorbitant amounts of money with little to no results to show for their effort. Consumers should be aware of DTC ads and should look into the advertised products success rates before they buy into the product.

Consumers who are pregnant or wish to become pregnant should also know about the cesarean birth (C-Section) option. C-section births have become a very common method of delivery, though in many cases the procedure is not even necessary. Consumers should also know that in many cases if a woman has had a C-section in the past, then they are at risk to lose the option to deliver their next child in a different way. “in some parts of the country, women who have previously had a cesarean are denied the option to try for a vaginal birth because of hospital policy or because they can’t find a doctor who will agree to the option” (Roan 2017). Consumers should be aware of this term because by doing a cesarean birth option they could potentially lose their choice of birthing method for their next child.

Consumers should also be aware of terms such as cord blood. A consumer may be offered to save and freeze their newborns umbilical cord because the stem cells could prove to be useful in curing any complications later in their newborns life. This new fad is not all it seems though, there is no real guarantee that spending the money on saving the cord blood can actually help. If the newborn is born with a disease, then the cord blood is likely to have the same contaminates. The consumer is not informed of this issue though, they are led to believe that they have secured their child’s future in case of the worst.

Resources: 

Moninger, J. (2017). The Cord Blood Controversy. Parents. Retrieved 23 October 2017, from http://www.parents.com/pregnancy/my-baby/cord-blood-banking/the-cord-blood-controversy

Roan, S. (2017). Birth options: More women should have choice of vaginal birth after C-section, panel says. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 23 October 2017, from http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-0323-hosp-vbac-20100323-story.html

Walden, Rachel. 2017. “Direct-To-Consumer: Fertility Clinic Advertising On The Web – NWHN”. National Womens Health Network. https://www.nwhn.org/direct-to-consumer-fertility-clinic-advertising-on-the-web/.

 

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