Glossary Building Post – 2

This week’s post was really eye-opening which led to a lot of reading this weekend. From learning about the chemicals in cosmetics to automobile safety recall and the nutrition section on the Center for Science in the Public Interest webpage, I was able to jot down some (what I consider important) glossary terms.

The first term came from the Wal-Mart cosmetics article. Up until 2012, a hazardous chemical known as BPA, was used to make mostly plastic containers to store food, water or hygiene products such as shampoo or lotions. BPA stands for bisphenol-A. According to the mayoclinic and FDA, exposure to BPA can have “possible effects on the brain…” … “additional research suggests a possible link between BPA and increased blood pressure.” (Mayo Clinic, 2017).

If you drive, safety recalls are important! This is when basically, the manufacturer discovers an issue with the vehicle such as a faulty air bag and will repair it free of cost in order to comply with federal safety standards.

Trans fats should be illegal! While there is a complex variety of fats out there, it can be difficult to distinguish which ones are the good ones and which ones are the bad ones. Typically, food labels have 3 different fats: Saturated (BAD!!), Unsaturated (GOOD) and TRANS (THE WORST!). According to the CSPINET (Center for Science in the Public Interest), trans fats decreases your good cholesterol and promotes diabetes. Not only that but “Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health estimate that trans-fat causes 72,000 to 228,000 heart attacks, including roughly 50,000 fatal ones, per year (CSPINET).”

And Finally, DYES! Artificial food dyes are not something you normally think about when you’re out grocery shopping but they are just as harmful to your body because some even pose a risk of cancer.

BPA: A hazardous chemical known as BPA – bisphenol-A; was used to make mostly plastic containers to store food, water or hygiene products such as shampoo or lotions. MayoClinic

Safety Recall: When the manufacturer discovers an issue with the vehicle and will repair it free of cost in order to comply with federal safety standards.

 Trans-fats: “Most of the trans fat Americans consume is artificial trans fat that comes from partially hydrogenated oil. Partial hydrogenation is a process in which hydrogen is added to an oil to make it more solid, like margarine or shortening (CSPINET).”

Artificial food DYES: “Commonly used food dyes, such as Yellow 5 and Yellow 6, and Red 40, pose risks including hyperactivity in children. Some also pose a risk of cancer (like Red 3) and allergic reactions (CSPINET).”

Sources

CSPINET. (2017). Food Dyes | Center for Science in the Public Interest. [online] Available at:

https://cspinet.org/eating-healthy/ingredients-concern/food-dyes [Accessed 15 Oct. 2017].

CSPINET. (2017). Trans Fat | Center for Science in the Public Interest. [online] Available at:

https://cspinet.org/eating-healthy/foods-avoid/trans-fats [Accessed 15 Oct. 2017]. 

Mayo Clinic. (2017). Tips to reduce your exposure to BPA. [online] Available at:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/bpa/faq-20058331 [Accessed 15 Oct. 2017].

NHTSA. (2017). What is a Safety Recall? | Safercar.gov | NHTSA. [online] Available at:

https://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/recalls/recallproblems.cfm [Accessed 15 Oct. 2017].

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s