Glossary Post 3 and 4

Infant mortality rate: Compares the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.

COUNTRY COMPARISON: INFANT MORTALITY RATE. (n.d.). Retrieved July 20, 2017, from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/2091rank.html

Population-based practice: A population is a collection of individuals who have one or more personal or environmental characteristics in common

About MDH. (n.d.). Retrieved July 20, 2017, from http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/opi/cd/phn/docs/0303phn_popbasedpractice.pdf

Primary care: Is that care provided by physicians specifically trained for and skilled in comprehensive first contact and continuing care for persons with any undiagnosed sign, symptom, or health concern (the “undifferentiated” patient) not limited by problem origin (biological, behavioral, or social), organ system, or diagnosis.

Primary Care. (2017, March 03). Retrieved July 20, 2017, from http://www.aafp.org/about/policies/all/primary-care.html

Social Norms: are the rules of behavior that are considered acceptable in a group or society. People who do not follow these norms may be shunned or suffer some kind of consequence. Norms change according to the environment or situation and may change or be modified over time.

Y. (2016, July 18). Social Norm Examples. Retrieved July 20, 2017, from http://examples.yourdictionary.com/social-norm-examples.html

Accreditation: is a process of review that healthcare organizations participate in to demonstrate the ability to meet regulatory requirements and accreditation standards established by a recognized accreditation organization. Accreditation reflects an agency’s dedication and commitment to meeting standards that demonstrate a higher level of performance and patient care.

Accreditation Commission for Health Care . (n.d.). Retrieved July 20, 2017, from http://www.achc.org/about-accreditation.html

Chronic Diseases: The Leading Causes of Death and Disability in the United States. Chronic diseases and conditions—such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and arthritis—are among the most common, costly, and preventable of all health problems.

Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. (2017, June 28). Retrieved July 20, 2017, from https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/overview/index.htm

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s